Adrenaline

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I’ve never read anything by Jeff Abbott before, but on the strength of this book I shall certainly be seeking out all of his back catalogue, and have already added the next Sam Capra novel, The Last Minute’, to my to be read pile.

The CIA is convinced that Sam has turned traitor and will do everything in it’s power to prove it. Sam must avoid capture, save the kidnapped daughter of a billionaire, find his missing wife and child, and all while trying to prove his innocence.

With the help of a mysterious organisation with seemingly unlimited resources, Sam sets out to find the truth, and clear his name.

Things you enjoy when you’re drunk

I’ve been stuck in bed all day swinging between hot and cold sweats as my body is currently being used as a battleground between some dreaded lurgi and my immune system.

While I’ve been trying to keep myself amused I have been perusing the files of some recently re-discovered SD cards.

I’d forgotten I’d got this. I took this video in Piccadilly Circus last February. I was very drunk, after spending several hours frequenting the hostelries of Leicester Square, celebrating achieving a lifelong ambition to meet Stan Lee, at the inaugural London Super ComicCon .

I must admit to being quite surprised at how steady this video footage is given my level of inebriation at the time. I do know when I watched it at the time I thought it was brilliant. Watching it back it’s not as good as I remembered, but it’s still good entertainment, so enjoy watching, if only to appreciate the things I enjoy when I’m drunk.

The White Tiger

Painting a stark picture of modern day India, this is a great story of one boys efforts to rise out of the darkness of where he was born.

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Balram Halwai, the eponymous ‘white tiger’, is a diminutive, overweight ex-teashop worker who now earns his living as a chauffeur. But this is only one side of his protean personality; he deals in confidence scams, over-ambitious business promotions (built on the shakiest of foundations) and enjoys approaching life with a philosophical turn of mind. But is Balram also a murderer? We learn the answer as we devour these 500 odd pages. Born into an impoverished family, Balram is removed from school by his parents in order to earn money in a thankless job: shop employee. He is forced into banal, mind-numbing work. But Balram dreams of escaping — and a chance arises when a well-heeled village landlord takes him on as a chauffeur for his son (although the duties involve transporting the latter’s wife and two Pomeranian dogs). From the rich new perspective offered to him in this more interesting job, Balram discovers New Delhi, and a vision of the city changes his life forever. His learning curve is very steep, and he quickly comes to believe that the way to the top is by the most expedient means. And if that involves committing the odd crime of violence, he persuades himself that this is what successful people must do.